The Concept of Violence in Buddhism

Winja Kumari, Junaidi Junaidi, Haudi Haudi, Lisniasari Lisniasari, Eko Pramono

Abstract


This paper came up to the surface of ethical confusion of why people tend to use violence to solve many problems. The method used in writing this article is library research. In this article, the author collects data from suttas, articles or journals related to the study of violence in Buddhism. The author analyzes this topic concerning violence in the perspectives of Buddhism generally, especially advices and stories that had been recorded in the Pali Canon and other sources. For the Examples are from the story of Angulimala, the dispute over water between the Sakyas and the Koliyas. In human relationships, it is impossible to avoid disagreement. People might have similar or totally opposite views. The disagreement can be solved by loving speech, deep listening, and understanding. It is not always the case that all disagreement can be solved. If the disagreement prolongs for a certain period of time, then disputes start to arise. People tend to be attached to their own view or collective view. For the next unpredictable phase, they may be using violence of body, speech, and mind to persuade other people. Violence pertained to the use of physical, speech, and ill will to harm others is to inflict fear. Human long history related closely to fear when making a decision, so no wonder inflicting fear can be one of the ways. Buddhism is a peaceful religion. This is a religion that is no violence in it. There is a key virtue of Buddhism that is the virtue of No violence. No violence refers to the action of non-harming, not to injure, or non-violence. It applies to all living beings. The teaching of the Buddha is clearly associated with non-violence or the principle of Ahimsa (non violence), therefore inflicting fear is inconsistent with the Ahimsa (non violence) which’s teaching of the Buddha.


Keywords


violence; non violence; Buddhism

Full Text:

PDF

References


Retrieved on 18 April 2019, https://www.dalailama.com/the-dalai-lama/biography-and-daily-life/brief-biography.

_____. Buddhism and War. BBC Webiste, Retrieved on 17 April 2019, http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/buddhism/buddhistethics/war.shtml.

_____. Buddhism on Peace and Violence. Georgetown University. Berkley Center For Religion, Peace & World Affairs. Retrieved on 18 April 2019, https://berkleycenter.georgetown.edu/essays/buddhism-on-peace-and-violence.

_____. Wisdom Library. Kamupadana. Retrieved on 15 April 2019, https://www.wisdomlib.org/definition/kamupadana.

Ācāriya Buddharakkhita (tr.). (2019). Piya Vagga. Dhp 60 (Sutta Central). Retrieved on 18 April, https://suttacentral.net/dhp209-220/en/buddharakkhita.

Ajahn Pasano. (2019). The Four Parameters of Clinging. Buddhasasana: A Buddhist Page by Binh Anson. Retrieved on 15 April, https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha284.htm.

Alen, Charles. (2012). Ashoka: The Search for India’s Lost Emperor. London: Hachette Digital,.

Bhikkhu Sujato (tr.). (2019). Aṅgulimālattheragāthā. Thag 16.8 (Sutta Central), Retrieved on 24 February, http://www.onelittleangel.com/sacred/books/dhammapada.asp?mc=9#

Bhikkhu Sujato (tr.). (2019). At Sāmagāmasutta. MN.ii.243 (Sutta Central). Retrieved on 17 April, https://suttacentral.net/mn104/en/sujato.

Bhikkhu Sujato (tr.). (2019). Kaccānagottasutta. SN.ii.16 (Sutta Central). Retrieved on 17 April, https://suttacentral.net/sn12.15/en/sujato.

Bhikkhu Sujato (tr.). (2019). The Shorter Discourse on the Lion’s Roar. MN.i.63 (Sutta Central). Retrieved on 16 April, https://suttacentral.net/mn11/en/sujato.

Bhikkhu Sujato (tr.). (2019). The Three Knowledges. DN.i.235 (Sutta Central). Retrieved on 18 April, https://suttacentral.net/dn13/en/sujato.

Bhikkhu Sujato (tr.). Is This What You Think Of Me? MN.ii.238 (Sutta Central), https://suttacentral.net/mn103/en/sujato

Burton, David. (2017). Buddhism: A Contemporary Philosophical Investigation. New York: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group.

Conze, Edward. (1957). Buddhist Scripture. London: Penguin Classics.

Gersch, Irvine S. Prof., Gersch, Adam. (2003). A Practical Guide to Conciliation and Mediation. New York: RoutledgeFalmer Tayloer & Francis Group.

Goodman, Charles. (2009). Consequences of Compassion: An Interpretation & Defense of Buddhist Ethics. New York: Oxford University Press.

Horner, I.B (tr.). (2019). Discourse with Angulimala. MN.ii.97 (Sutta Central). Retrieved on 18 April, https://suttacentral.net/mn86/en/horner.

Lewis, Craig. (2019). Buddhists Commemorate 70th Anniversary of Hiroshima Atomic Bomb. Buddhist Door. Retrieved on 18 April, https://www.buddhistdoor.net/news/buddhists-commemorate-70th-anniversary-of-hiroshima-atomic-bomb.

Machuca, Diego E. (ed). (2013). Disagreement and Skepticism. New York and London: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group.

Melfianora. (2019). “Writing Scientific Papers With Literary Studies.” Open Science Framework, 2.

Niati, D. R., Siregar, Z. M. E., & Prayoga, Y. (2021). The Effect of Training on Work Performance and Career Development: The Role of Motivation as Intervening Variable. Budapest International Research and Critics Institute (BIRCI-Journal): Humanities and Social Sciences, 4(2), 2385–2393. https://doi.org/10.33258/birci.v4i2.1940

Norbu, Dawa. (2001). China’s Tibet Policy. Surrey: Curzon Press.

Pabongka Rinpoche. (1991). Liberation in the Palm of Your Hand: A Concise discourse on the path to enlightenment. Boston: Wisdom Publications.

Perrett, Roy W. (1996). “Buddhism, Euthanasia and the Santity of Life”, Journal of Medical Ethics, Vol. 22, (October): p. 310.

Ramsbotham, Oliver. (2010). Transforming Violent Conflict: Radical Disagreement, Dialogue and Survival. New York: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group.

Shah, M. M., et al. (2020). The Development Impact of PT. Medco E & P Malaka on Economic Aspects in East Aceh Regency. Budapest International Research and Critics Institute-Journal (BIRCI-Journal) Volume 3, No 1, Page: 276-286.

Smith, Huston. (1991). The World’s Religions: Our Great Wisdom Traditions. New York: Harpen & Row Publishers Inc.

Tersman, Folke. (2006). Moral Disagreement. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Thich, Nhat Hanh. (1987). Old Path White Clouds. California: Parallax Press.

Thich, Nhat Hanh. (2002). No Death No Fear. New York: Riverhead Books.

Thich, Nhat Hanh. (2007). Chanting From The Heart. California: Parallax Press.

Thich, Nhat Hanh. (2019). Dharma Talk: Precepts as a Way of Life. Mindfulness Bell Website. Retrieved on 17 April, https://www.mindfulnessbell.org/archive/2016/03/dharma-talk-precepts-as-a-way-of-life-2

Werdhiastutie, A. et al. (2020). Achievement Motivation as Antecedents of Quality Improvement of Organizational Human Resources. Budapest International Research and Critics Institute-Journal (BIRCI-Journal) Volume 3, No 2, Page: 747-752.




DOI: https://doi.org/10.33258/birci.v5i3.6812

Article Metrics

Abstract view : 41 times
PDF - 12 times

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.